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Stanton Friedman
Stanton Friedman

Stanton Terry Friedman (born July 29, 1934) is a retired nuclear physicist and professional ufologist who resides in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. He is the original civilian investigator of the Roswell incident. He worked on research and development projects for several large companies. In 1970, Friedman left full-time employment as a physicist to pursue the scientific investigation of UFOs. Since then, he has given lectures at more than 600 colleges and to more than 100 professional groups in 50 states, 10 provinces, and 19 countries outside the US.[2] Additionally, he has worked as a consultant on the topic. He has published more than 80 UFO-related papers and has appeared on many radio and television programs. He has also provided written testimony to Congressional hearings and appeared twice at the United Nations. Friedman has consistently favoured use of the term "flying saucer" in his work, saying "Flying saucers are, by definition, unidentified flying objects, but very few unidentified flying objects are flying saucers. I am interested in the latter, not the former." Friedman used to refer to himself as "The Flying Saucer Physicist", because of his degrees in nuclear physics and work on nuclear projects Friedman was the first civilian to document the site of the Roswell UFO incident, and supports the hypothesis that it was a genuine crash of an extraterrestrial spacecraft.[5] In 1968 Friedman told a committee of the U.S. House of Representatives that the evidence suggests that Earth is being visited by intelligently controlled extraterrestrial vehicles.[6] Friedman also stated he believed that UFO sightings were consistent with magnetohydrodynamic propulsion. In 1996, after researching and fact checking the Majestic 12 documents, Friedman said that there was no substantive grounds for dismissing their authenticity. In 2004, on George Noory's Coast to Coast radio show, Friedman debated Seth Shostak, the SETI Institute's Senior Astronomer. Like Friedman, Shostak also believes in the existence of intelligent life other than humans; however, unlike Friedman, he doesn't believe such life is now on Earth or is related to UFO sightings. Friedman has hypothesized that UFOs may originate from relatively nearby sunlike stars.(p. 217) A piece of evidence that he often cites with respect to this hypothesis is the 1964 star map drawn by alleged alien abductee Betty Hill during a hypnosis session, which she said was shown to her during her abduction. Astronomer Marjorie Fish constructed a three-dimensional map of nearby sun-like stars and claimed a good match from the perspective of Zeta Reticuli, about 39 light years distant. The fit of the Hill/Fish star maps was hotly debated in the December 1974 edition of Astronomy Magazine, with Friedman and others defending the statistical validity of the match.